Thursday, July 19, 2018

From the Dick Buchanan Files: Random Favorite Gag Cartoons 1947 – 1962

The wonderful Dick Buchanan has contributed some of his all time favorite classic gag cartoons today. Take a look! Some wonderful work here.

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RANDOM FAVORITE
GAG CARTOONS

1947 – 1962

This time of year finds Greenwich Village infested with tourists. They go on Food Tours, History Tours, Architectural Tours and Bob Dylan Was Here Tours. Those who venture forth by themselves usually get lost or, at least they look lost. That’s why, rather than mingle with the masses, your friendly Cartoon Clip File Curator prefers remain safely inside his curiously decorated apartment, emerging only for late night beer runs. The time has been well spent. The result is still another random collection of mid-century gag cartoons, some of which bear an eerie relevance to today’s world.


1. DANIEL ALAIN. Collier’s April 5, 1947.



2. CHARLES SAXON. The Saturday Evening Post circa 1947.



3. DICK CAVALLI. 1000 Jokes Magazine June-August, 1958.



4. TOM HENDERSON. American Legion Magazine March 1947.
 


5. CLYDE LAMB. American Legion Magazine September 1954.



6. AL JOHNS. The Saturday Evening Post January 20, 1951.


7. GARDNER REA. Collier’s April 5, 1947.


8. VIRGIL PARTCH. Collier’s October 23, 1943.




9. JOSEPH MIRACHI. Look Magazine January 3, 1961.


 10. JOHN RUGE. Look Magazine October 15, 1957.



11. JOHN DEMPSEY. Look Magazine August 15, 1961.



12. BURR SHAFER. Collier’s December 2, 1950.



13. BOB WEBER. The Saturday Evening Post September 29, 1962.


14. HERB GREEN. 1000 Jokes Magazine June-August, 1958.


15. W. A. VANESLOW. American Magazine January 1950.







Wednesday, July 18, 2018

From the Dick Buchanan Files: Gardner Rea Gag Cartoons 1938 - 1963

Once again, Dick Buchanan has braved the stacks of vintage magazines that he has in his Greenwich Village apartment to come up with a special selection of cartoons. 

Gardner Rea (1894 - 1966) was one of the original contributing cartoonists to The New Yorker magazine.

He went to high school in Columbus, where he met James Thurber. After earning a degree at Ohio State University (where he helped to found and edited The Sundial, the OSU humor magazine), Gardner Rea traveled to New York City.

He married Dorothy Julia Calkins in 1920, and the newlyweds lived in a house he designed in Brookhaven, Long Island. Brookhaven would be where they would bring up two daughters and spend the rest of their lives.

From the New York Times:

That somewhat serpentine line of his drawings, without detail, became his trademark, along with a trick of having in each picture a small shape, such as a necktie, inked in solid black. He explained the "wiggle" of his line with another gag—"Nobody will catch on when I get senile."

But Mr. Rea distinguished between verbal humor and the art of drawing. He told an interviewer in 1946 that in common with most critics, he considered "that line is the highest, most difficult form of art, and so long long as the fundamental design is there, I can't see that it makes the slightest difference, technically speaking, if the subject matter is humorous."
Here are some great samples of Gardner Rea's work. Thanks, Dick Buchanan!

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GARDNER REA

GAG CARTOONS



1938 - 1963



    Gardner Rea was one of the most prolific cartoonists of the 20th Century. His impeccable, seemingly simple line drawings delivered countless quality gags, most of which were all his own creation. Indeed, for a time he wrote 40 gags a week, which he sold to editors.  Among the lucky New Yorker recipients of his efforts were the usual suspects--Peter Arno and Helen Hokinson.

    Hailing from Ohio, Rea was born in 1892. He was set on becoming a painter until he sold a cartoon to Life.  The rest is history.

    After graduating from Ohio State he moved to New York in 1914 to become a freelancer. He already had sales to Puck, Life and Judge and soon became one of the most popular cartoonists of the 1920’s.  He was one of the cartoonists who appeared in the first issue of The New Yorker.

   His work was found in all of the major magazines of the 20th Century—from Puck, Life and Judge to The New Yorker, Collier’s, The Saturday Evening Post, Esquire, Playboy, Look and even 1000 Jokes Magazine.

   Here, haphazardly extracted from the Cartoon Clip File, are but a few of his marvelous contributions to the world of humor during an amazing career . . .



1.  Collier’s May 28, 1938.



2.  Collier’s circa 1940’s.




3. The Saturday Evening Post April 11, 1942.



4.  American Magazine January 1944.




5.  Collier’s October 20, 1945.

 6.  Collier’s January 5, 1946.



7.  True Magazine October 1947.



8.  Collier’s May 31, 1947.


9.  Collier’s August 7, 1948.


10.  Collier’s August 7, 1948.



11.  True Magazine January 1948.



11.  Collier’s August 20, 1954.
  
 13.  Collier’s December 7, 1956.


14.  Look Magazine November 11, 1958.

  


15.  Look Magazine September 12, 1961.




16.  1000 Jokes Magazine December, 1962-February, 1963.     


Alex Jay has a wonderful piece on the life and times of Gardner Rea at Stripper's Guide.

The New York Times, 29 December 1966 obituary.

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Vintage "How to Draw Cartoons" Ads


Here are a few advertisements for how to draw courses or cartoon correspondence courses, as they were called.  Above: a bit of a cheat. This was a promotional banner for The Toonseum's gallery show on the same subject. I was honored to be able to contribute a piece to it. This was back when John Kelley was running the show, and the Toonseum was in a building. 

Here are some other great old ads:














Monday, July 16, 2018

Lovely Art at the Gorham, ME Goodwill




I didn’t draw this but I admire the Gorham, Maine Goodwill employee who spent all this time creating it on a dry-erase board and the little color drawings of summery items were great.

I didn’t buy anything here either.

The Garden As of Mid-July 2018



Before:



 After:


Tomatoes and cucumbers:


Zinnias!