Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Vintage "How to Draw Cartoons" Ads


Here are a few advertisements for how to draw courses or cartoon correspondence courses, as they were called.  Above: a bit of a cheat. This was a promotional banner for The Toonseum's gallery show on the same subject. I was honored to be able to contribute a piece to it. This was back when John Kelley was running the show, and the Toonseum was in a building. 

Here are some other great old ads:














Monday, July 16, 2018

Lovely Art at the Gorham, ME Goodwill




I didn’t draw this but I admire the Gorham, Maine Goodwill employee who spent all this time creating it on a dry-erase board and the little color drawings of summery items were great.

I didn’t buy anything here either.

The Garden As of Mid-July 2018



Before:



 After:


Tomatoes and cucumbers:


Zinnias!




Friday, July 13, 2018

MAN THE BEAST by Virgil VIP Partch Part 3





Here's the last installment of cartoons from MAN THE BEAST. It's copyright 1951, 1953 by Virgil Franklin Partch, II, "the funniest cartoonist in the world."

This is Part 3.

Part 1 is here.

Part 2 is here.






Part 1 is here.

Part 2 is here.

Thursday, July 12, 2018

MAN THE BEAST by Virgil VIP Partch Part 2




Here are some cartoons from MAN THE BEAST. It's copyright 1951, 1953 by Virgil Franklin Partch, II, "the funniest cartoonist in the world."

This is Part 2. Part 1 is here.



There is an apocryphal story that Virgil VIP Partch never got into The New Yorker magazine.

"It's because how his characters looked. He drew nostrils on his people," I was told, more than once, by a cartoonist colleague."The New Yorker didn't like it."

It's not true. I mean it's true that VIP did draw nostrils -- but he DID get into The New Yorker more than once. (According to Michael Maslin's great NYer Cartoonists A-Z list, six cartoons of Partch's appeared between 1942 and 1976.)

And does everyone know about Virgil Partch drawing six fingers?

Cartoonist Ed Nofziger said of his friend:

"As a 'Disney man,' Partch was required to follow such strict edicts as, for example, drawing four fingers on Mickey Mouse to make it easier for animating. So VIP went the other way and drew six to eight fingers on his cartoons. It was sort of teasing (the Disney style) in a way." -- LA Times

More Partch to come ...