Monday, October 14, 2019

I'm Away from the Blog


I'm away from the blog. I look forward to seeing you next week!

Friday, October 11, 2019

From the Dick Buchanan Files: Color Gag Cartoons 1947 - 1957

Dick Buchanan has kindly scanned in some rare and funny examples of color vintage single panel cartoons from his huge collection. I think these are particularly good ones, drawn by those golden age gag cartoon masters. And, just to point out an oddity, look for two cartoons regarding pregnancy and the game of bridge! Crazy!

Thanks so much, and here's Dick:


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COLOR GAG CARTOONS
(1947 – 1957)

It’s time once more for another installment of Color Gag Cartoons. This group includes some especially fine specimens . . .

1.  ED NOFZIGER.  Nofziger had a very loose, whimsical drawing style. He was considered to be one of the finest cartoonists of animals. The Saturday Evening Post  March 5, 1949.


2.  JOHN ALBANO.  The Saturday Evening Post  February 23, 1957.


3.  JERRY MARCUS.  The Saturday Evening Post  May 18, 1957.


4.  BILL HARRISON.  American Magazine April, 1952.


 5.  HARRY LYONS.  The Saturday Evening Post  April 13, 1957.


6.  LARRY REYNOLDS.  Collier’s  October 29, 1954.


7.  MERVYN WILSON.  Wilson was a Punch cartoonist and cover artist. Punch  October, 1947. 


8.  JACK MARKOW.  Markow taught cartooning at the School of Visual Arts, wrote 4 “How-to” books on cartooning and gag writing and for 15 years wrote a cartooning column for Writer’s Digest.  He received the National Cartoonist Society’s Gag Cartoon Award in 1979. The Saturday Evening Post  February 26, 1949.


9.  LESLIE STARKE.  Popular Punch cartoonist Starke’s work also appeared in The New Yorker, Esquire and Collier’s.  The Saturday Evening Post  November 5, 1949.


10.  KATE OSANN.  When Tizzy first appeared in Collier’s, her hair was red. She was a blonde when the cartoon became a NEA syndicated gag panel. In the Tizzy paperback her hair was black. Collier’s October 29, 1954.


11.  BORIS DRUCKER.  The Saturday Evening Post  September 1, 1949.


12.  CY OLSON.  Olson ‘s syndicated gag panel, Office Hours, ran from 1960 to 1974.  American Magazine  December, 1952.


13.  FRANK BEAVEN.  Esquire  April, 1947.


14.  RODNEY de SARRO.  De Sarro’s unique art deco style earned him three early appearances in The New Yorker (1943-44) His work appeared frequently in The Saturday Evening Post and Collier’s. The Saturday Evening Post  February 16, 1946.


15.  STANLEY & JANICE BERENSTAIN.  The Saturday Evening Post  March 5, 1949.



Thursday, October 10, 2019

Happy Birthday, Orlando Busino

Today is the birthday of the one and only Orlando Busino. He is 93!

He grew up in "cow country," in Binghamton, New York. He developed an interest in cartooning at the age of nine, and he sold his first cartoon to the New York Mirror at the age of 14. "Bulldog, with Central, the Wonder Dog" was the name of the comic strip he created for his high school paper. Look at an old copy of the magazine Open Road for Boys, and you will see Orlando's cartoons winning many of their contests. Orlando was drafted into the army and served in Panama from 1945 to 1947. He drew cartoons for the army unit newspaper there. Returning home, he attended Binghamton State, and then the University of Iowa, drawing cartoons for their school papers.

My friend Dick Buchanan picks up the story, and shares some of Orlando's great gag cartoons:






ORLANDO BUSINO

GAG CARTOONS 1957 TO 1968


After graduating in 1952, he moved to New York City. He worked in the ad department of the Macmillan Publishing Company. At night he attended the Cartoonists and Illustrators School. A year later he sold his first cartoon to The Saturday Evening Post, launching his career as a freelance cartoonist.

Busino also worked for Archie Comics in the 1960s, doing covers, illustrations, and stories for "Tales Calculated To Drive You Bats." This work was later reprinted in Archie's Madhouse.

Orlando Busino’s created “Gus,” the antics of a large white dog, which first appeared in Boys' Life in January 1970. It took over the honor spot on the "Think & Grin" page (the spot headed for nearly 20 years by Clyde Lamb “Millicent” and briefly by John Gallagher’s “Cartoon Bug”). Gus appeared on the cover of Boys' Life in December 1981.

Orlando Busino received the National Cartoonist Society Gag Cartoon Award for 1965, 1967, and 1968. This selection pf a few of his gag cartoons chronicles his fine work from 1957 through the 1968.




1. ORLANDO BUSINO. The Saturday Evening Post June 29, 1957.


2. ORLANDO BUSINO. The Saturday Evening Post July 27, 1957.


3. ORLANDO BUSINO. True Magazine October 1958.


4. ORLANDO BUSINO. The Saturday Evening Post January 25, 1958.


5. ORLANDO BUSINO. American Legion Magazine November, 1960.


6. ORLANDO BUSINO. For Laughing Out Loud April-June, 1961.


7. ORLANDO BUSINO. The Saturday Evening Post December 22-29, 1962.


8. ORLANDO BUSINO. The Saturday Evening Post March 10, 1962.


9. ORLANDO BUSINO. True Magazine August, 1962.


10. ORLANDO BUSINO. The Saturday Evening Post February 22, 1964.


11. ORLANDO BUSINO. 1000 Jokes Magazine December, 1963 - February, 1964.


12. ORLANDO BUSINO. The Saturday Evening Post May 21, 1966.


13. ORLANDO BUSINO. The Saturday Evening Post May 21, 1966.


14. ORLANDO BUSINO. Boys’ Life March, 1967.


15. ORLANDO BUSINO. Boys’ Life May, 1968.


16. ORLANDO BUSINO. Boys’ Life October, 1968.


Wednesday, October 09, 2019

TEENSVILLE U.S.A. Edited by Lawrence Lariar Part 6


Above cartoon by Edwin Lepper.



Here are some teen cartoons from the book TEENSVILLE U.S.A. It was edited and is copyright 1959 by Lawrence Lariar, and published by Dodd, Mead.

Part one
Part two
Part three
Part four
Part five 
Part six

Ned Hilton:


Goldstein:



Kastner:



Mary Blanchard:


David Pascal:


John Norment:


Edwin Lepper:


Roy Fox:


David Pascal:


Kate Osann:



Bob Schroeter:

Charles Pearson:


Tuesday, October 08, 2019

Dana Fradon 1922 - 2019


Above: the back cover bio from his book MY SON THE MEDICINE MAN.



Dana Fradon, the last of the cartoonists to sign a contract with the New Yorker during Harold Ross' time, passed away at his home, surrounded by family, in Woodstock, NY on September 3rd. He was 97.

From Michael Maslin's Inkspill:

Dana Fradon, the last surviving New Yorker cartoonist of Harold Ross’s era (he was the last cartoonist contracted under Mr. Ross’s editorship), and one of The New Yorker‘s most prolific cartoonists (he is in the top twenty of the magazine’s artists who have contributed over a thousand drawings), passed away October 3 in Woodstock, New York.  He was 97.  Mr. Fradon’s first cartoon appeared in the issue of May 1, 1948 (it appears below).  His last New Yorker drawing appeared April 21, 2003. Mr. Fradon was born April 14, 1922 in Chicago, Illinois.

 Dana Fradon's first New Yorker cartoon:


 Obituary in the Newtown Bee.

Monday, October 07, 2019

TEENSVILLE U.S.A. Edited by Lawrence Lariar Part 5


Above cartoon by Dan Tobin.


Here are some teen cartoons from the book TEENSVILLE U.S.A. It was edited and is copyright 1959 by Lawrence Lariar, and published by Dodd, Mead.

Part one
Part two
Part three
Part four
Part five 
Part six


Jim Whiting:



Bram:


Margaret Blanchard:


Brad Anderson:


Glenn Bernhardt:


Brad Anderson:


Wilkinson:


Bo Brown:


Bill Harrison:


John Dempsey:


Sam Cobean:




Part one
Part two
Part three
Part four
Part five 
Part six